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"Knowledge is the treasure of a wise man." - William Penn
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1600

20,000 Lenni Lenapes estimated to live in Delaware Valley

1610

Capt. Samuel Argall discovers large bay of water, names it Delaware Bay in honor of Sir Thomas West, Third Lord De La Ware

1620

Puritans sail for the New World - Plymouth Rock, MA.

1626

Attacks by the Susquehannock (Minqua) start against the Lenapes

1630-1635

Susquehannock attacks against Lenapes throughout southeast Pennsylvania, Lenapes become subjects to Susquehannocks

Devastating outbreak of Smallpox among the Lenapes, wipes out half of population

1638

First Swedish Colonists arrive to found eventual New Sweden Colony in Delaware Valley

1642-1651

English Civil War

1644 October 14

William Penn born

1651

Initial Dutch inroads in Delaware Valley, establishing Fort Casimir (New Castle)

1652

George Fox has his vision of “a great people to be gathered.”

1655

New Sweden Colony lost to the Dutch

1659-1664

Esopus Wars between Dutch, Mohawks, and Senecas, against Espous Tribes of Munsee

1661

Devastating outbreak of Smallpox hits Susquehannock, spreads to Lenapes

1664 June 5

Peter Larsson Cock patents original Shackamaxon Tract from Governor d’Hinojossa at New York

1665-1667

2nd Anglo-Dutch War, England takes control of New Amsterdam and New Sweden

1672-74

3rd Anglo-Dutch War, the Dutch regain New Sweden briefly, then lose it for good to England

1675

Iroquois defeat Susquehannock, Lenapes now under control of Iroquois

1677

Thomas Fairman arrives at Burlington, West Jersey

1678

Elizabeth Kinsey completes her late father’s transaction for 300-acre estate at Shackamaxon

1680

Thomas Fairman marries Elizabeth Kinsey at Burlington, West Jersey, moves to Shackamaxon

1681

William Penn given Charter for his colony of Pennsylvania sends William Markham to colony to facilitate transition

1682 January

William Haige, a William Penn’s Land Commissioner, lives with Fairman at Shackamaxon

August

Thomas Holme, Surveyor General for William Penn, lives with Fairman for six months at Shackamaxon

October

William Penn arrives in Delaware Valley

November

1683 February-March

Thomas Fairman allows William Penn to take over his house at Shackamaxon, Fairman removes to Frankford

August 16th

William Penn’s letter to the Free Society of Traders describing council with Indians, possibly the “Great Treaty.”

1708

Oldmixion publishes The British Empire in America, first history to mention Penn’s Treaty.

1718 July 30

William Penn dies

1764

Voltaire quote on Penn’s Treaty first published

1771-1772

Benjamin West paints Penn’s Treaty with the Indians

1777-1778

General Simcoe of the Queen’s Rangers post guards to protect Treaty Tree during British occupation of Philadelphia

1795

Matthew Vandusen purchases Fairman Mansion and Treaty Tree grounds

1797

Proud publishes his History of Pennsylvania, first local history book to mention Penn’s Treaty

1798-1800

William Birch's City of Philadelphia published, includes print of Treaty Tree

1810 March 5

The Treaty Elm Tree uprooted in storm - afterwards many relics made from tree

1813

Clarkson’s biography of William Penn published, Peace Treaty mentioned

1820-1821

Benjamin Hicks begins painting his Peaceable Kingdom series

1824

Lafayette’s Visit to Philadelphia stirs historical interest - Penn Society founded

1825

Fairman Mansion razed to straighten Beach Street

Roberts Vaux reads his report at Historical Society of Pennsylvania, calls for Penn Treaty Memorial

1827

Penn Treaty Monument placed by the Penn Society

1836

John Fanning Watson’s Communication on Penn's Treaty

Du Ponceau & Fisher report on Penn Treaty

Roberts Vaux, chief advocate for Penn Treaty Memorial dies

1844

Peter S. Du Ponceau another advocate for Penn Treaty Memorial dies

1845

First mentioning of Penn Treaty Monument in decline

1848

County Board advocates for purchasing the Penn Treaty grounds

1851

West’s painting of Penn’s Treaty sold at Penn Family estate auction

1854

Philadelphia County consolidated into the City of Philadelphia

1856

“For Rent” signs go up on Penn Treaty grounds

1857

Granville Penn presents Wampum Belt to Historical Society of Pennsylvania

1860

John Fanning Watson, advocate for Penn Treaty Memorial dies

1869

State Legislator Adaire votes for funding the Penn Treaty Memorial

1870

Resolution introduced into City Council to purchase Penn Treaty grounds

1872

“For Rent” signs again appear on Penn Treaty grounds

1880

Resolution introduced in City Council to get fencing for Penn Treaty Monument

1890

“For Sale” signs appear on Penn Treaty grounds

1891

Kensington lawyer Joseph L. Tull argues in City Council for a park at the Penn Treaty Monument

1892 January 25

Philadelphia City Council and the Fairmount Park Art Commission join hands to establish Penn Treaty Park

February 25

Bills submitted to Council for creation of Penn Treaty Park

March 2

Penn Treaty Park placed on the City Plan

March 10

Ordinance passed to purchase the Penn Treaty Monument grounds

July 15

Plans for Penn Treaty Park available to view

1893 January

Bureau of City Property budgets for improvements at Penn Treaty Park

October 28

Official Grand Opening of Penn Treaty Park - 10,000-15,000 in attendance

Henry C. Merritt hired as first Park superintendent - Patrols Park

1910

Federal Government tries to build immigrant station next to Penn Treaty Park - neighborhood rejects idea

1917

Henry C. Merritt dies - Park begins its first decline

1920

PECO builds plant next to Penn Treaty Park

1920's

Penn Treaty Park's Pier 57 starts to be used for Harbor Police & Fire Units

1931

Terrible explosion of Police Harbor boat as it approached Pier 57

1940's

Park in decline - Transferred from Bureau of City Property to Bureau of Recreation

1949

State Representative Miles Lederer calls for funding to restore Park

1954

Jurisdiction of Park transferred from Bureau of Recreation to Fairmount Park Commission - patrol watch started

1960's

Park in decline, I-95 Bulldozes way through neighborhood cutting off Park from community - patrol watch stopped

1970's

Bicentennial Celebration stirs interest in renovating Park- old Pier 57 removed - obelisk moved near to original Treaty Tree

Dr. Etta May Pettyjohn calls for building Penn Treaty Museum

1982

Tercentennial Celebration at Penn Treaty Park - Park to expand by 5 _ acres

New sculpture of William Penn by Frank C. Gaylord

1987

Official rededication of expanded and restored Penn Treaty Park

2002

Treaty of “renewed brotherhood” signed between Lenape Indian Tribe and Delaware River Greenway Partnership

2007

Threats of Casino being built near Park

 

 

 

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